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When I bought my last car it was 16 months old. Shortly after I got it I started to remove the wheels so that I could get a good look at the brake discs and pads, but I just couldn't remove two of the wheels. I took the car to my dealer and they were able to remove the wheels (big hammer?), and before they refitted them they smeared copper grease onto the mounting faces. They said the wheels were stuck because of corrosion, but that the copper grease would prevent any further problems ~ which it did.

I'm sure that no car manufacturer would condone doing this, but I wonder whether any other members have used the copper grease treatment. My next (new) car is going to get it before corrosion has had a chance to occur. However, I won't put the grease onto the bolt/stud threads as the following webpage suggests! http://tinyurl.com/avp6apx
The specified wheel bolt torques are for clean and unlubricated threads.
 

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Here in Norway its "normal" that the wheels are stuck. Where i live they start salting the roads early October and keep doing that untill April. Usually you can kick the wheel off, or use a big sledge hammer. I know people that have taken their car to the workshop to get them off. I always use copperpaste on the bolts and between the wheel and disc.
 

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GlennTeg said:
I always use copperpaste on the bolts ..............
In that case you should adjust the bolt torque that you apply as per the recommendations in the first table in this document. http://www.leytonfasteners.co.uk/pdfs/TorqueValueGuide.pdf
 

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I always tighten the bolts by hand. Thighten them till its stops, and a then some more. ;-) Never had problems with bolts loosening.
 

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unfortunately is a normal reaction between alloy and steel,clean and dry both sides and apply grease,even normal grease will provide a moderate protection,as for bolts we never use it on these,it can have the opposite effect as dirt can be attracted to the exposed threads and be pulled through when withdrawing the bolt.
 

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If you ever have to hammer your rims off,

Only hit the rubber tyre not the rim with the hammer

Make you you have not taken all the nuts all the way off as you may knock the wheel off and cause further damage (it will alway land face down :0(. )
 

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Hi

I would never use a copper based grease on aluminium as it can cause I think it is electrostatic action (or bi matelic action) between the steel, aluminium and the copper grease. If copper grease still contains copper.
 

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Think I posted this somewhere - when I took my summers off there was a thin layer of corrosion, masked it all up and gave it a spray with aerosol grease.

Did put it as a recommendation to others as there is clearly no protection on from the line and only had car about 6 or 8 weeks before seeing it
 

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I have always used a copper based grease on cars with alloys following a bad experience some years ago. I take my wheels off after six months to clean and protect the back of them. Then I use 'Coppaslip' between the mating faces ONLY between the wheel hub and the back of the alloy wheel. Never had a problem removing, or loose wheels since. Wheel bolt threads are normally clean and dry when re torquing.
In my old aerospace life, a nut/ bolt would always have a different torque figure if it had oil or grease applied to the threads, and it would also vary according to the type of grease used.
 

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Whilst copper grease is a good way of overcoming the issue of the rim adhering to the hub if you get this problem don't hammer the wheels even on the tyres.


The way to remove them is to slack the lugs off a few turns with the weight still on the wheel. Then rock the car gently side to side. Can then be jacked up and the wheel changed normally.
 

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The above was just about to be my suggestion.

Done this many times, especially if the wheel has never been off or not in a long time.
 

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When I bought my last car it was 16 months old. Shortly after I got it I started to remove the wheels so that I could get a good look at the brake discs and pads, but I just couldn't remove two of the wheels. I took the car to my dealer and they were able to remove the wheels (big hammer?), and before they refitted them they smeared copper grease onto the mounting faces. They said the wheels were stuck because of corrosion, but that the copper grease would prevent any further problems ~ which it did.

I'm sure that no car manufacturer would condone doing this, but I wonder whether any other members have used the copper grease treatment. My next (new) car is going to get it before corrosion has had a chance to occur. However, I won't put the grease onto the bolt/stud threads as the following webpage suggests! http://tinyurl.com/avp6apx
The specified wheel bolt torques are for clean and unlubricated threads.
All my cars I have ever bought have always been treated in the following way:
1. I remove both front and back wheels and apply Copperslip Grease to the mating surfaces of the wheel and hubs.
2. I also apply Copperslip grease to the thread on the wheel bolts and nuts.

This prevents any corrosion forming and make the removal of the wheels hassle free.
 

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Bumping this thread.....

Had a puncture tonight, literally middle of nowhere (A9 Scotland) 2 degrees, light sleet!

Got the car jacked up, got the wheel nuts off, had the spare ready... 30 minutes of kicking the alloy I had to admit defeat and call Volvo assistance.

The truck arrived about 40 minutes later, and the guy had to beat the back of the wheel about 6 times with a big hammer (and marked the back of the alloy - but that is a different story) to free the wheel off.

In his opinion that wheel had never been off the car, despite it having had 4 dealer services and a dealer MOT.

I'll be making sure the rest of the wheels get a liberal coating of copper ease or silicon grease to make sure if this ever happens again I can get the wheel off myself at the side of the road.
 

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Bumping this thread.....

Had a puncture tonight, literally middle of nowhere (A9 Scotland) 2 degrees, light sleet!

Got the car jacked up, got the wheel nuts off, had the spare ready... 30 minutes of kicking the alloy I had to admit defeat and call Volvo assistance.

The truck arrived about 40 minutes later, and the guy had to beat the back of the wheel about 6 times with a big hammer (and marked the back of the alloy - but that is a different story) to free the wheel off.

In his opinion that wheel had never been off the car, despite it having had 4 dealer services and a dealer MOT.

I'll be making sure the rest of the wheels get a liberal coating of copper ease or silicon grease to make sure if this ever happens again I can get the wheel off myself at the side of the road.
For future reference, and the lucky ones that have a spare wheel.
Swing the spare wheel into the stuck wheel - rubber against rubber - that should do the trick without damaging the alloys.
 

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brilliant idea!

Wish I thought of that last night!
 

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Having found the wheels on our 2 year old BMW stuck on when fitting winters, I decided to get the V40 jacked up while I had the tools out on the drive and greased the spigots, which I'm pleased I did, as corrosion had already set in on a 9 month old car.


Ed
 

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I ride a motorbike all year,I only get car when it need's diesel, anyway anything that comes off or goes on the bike/car gets copper slipped, rubber grease,or ACF 50 spray depending on what it is,my one pet hate is when a vehicle is serviced they don't give the brakes a clean and lube ?,my bike gets done before and after winter.
 

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If your wheels are stuck and you live somewhere that has speed bumps, crack off the wheelnuts (don't loosen them completely) and drive slowly round the block. It should be enough to break the corrosion bond.

I always refit with copper grease on the mating surfaces and particularly the centre bore on the hub. Never put it on the wheel studs or nuts though - as mentioned up the thread having lube on a thread alters the torque rating and runs the risk of the nuts coming loose.
 
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