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Discussion Starter #1
Having test driven the Incription T3 Auto I did find it less compliant than a Ford Focus. Would I be happier with a Cross Country suspension?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've just got the CC yesterday. I'm really pleased with the suspension.
I was driving an Audi before which is much more rigid.
Audi are well known for rigid suspension so I think anything will beat it. I don't understand why manufacturers put in harsh suspensions. The role of the spring and damper is to keep the tyre in contact with the road so only one setup will work (for a given bump). If the spring is too hard the car lifts the tyre from the road.

So back to the CC. I tried one today and it is getting towards the compliance I like. I might sign!
 

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The CC is nice, Pro is the same trim level as Inscription. As you can probably guess, tyre size/ profile also make a big difference, but also Volvo recommend inflating the tyres to 'eco' pressures ie hard, some on the forum prefer to deflate them slightly. The D2 and T2 engined cars list a different suspension: comfort/touring (though not the cross countrys or r-designs), perhaps it may be worth your while trying to get a test drive in one of those.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did think about testing a 'non dynamic' chassis but the drop in power for the engine makes it most unlikely. My current car is 200BHP but slightly heavier than the V40. It looks like the CC on 17 inch wheels has plenty of rubber in the side walls (which probably protects the alloys better). Tyre pressure changes sound interesting as long as the wheels are not in danger from appalling pot holes. It seems unlikely on 17 inch wheels.
 

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I'm not sure you can get them (new) any more, but our T5 Cross Country (on 17s) not only has a reasonable level of comfort but handling is good too, there doesn't seem to be much of a compromise due to the higher/softer suspension. (Previous car to it was a Ford Focus)
Plus it has 4WD and well over 200bhp, especially with the Polestar Optimisation, so can really shift if necessary. 0:)
 

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My T3 car has 18” 225/45 tyres and I’ve also driven a D2 cc on 17” tyres, and an R-design D3 also on 17”. The larger wheels on mine do let you feel road imperfections, though I’ve more of an issue with my Pirelli tyres, which sometimes lose grip on very smooth tarmac - I prefer the Continentals and Michelins which were on the other cars. You do notice the increase in engine power, and others here love the even higher powered engines, but they’re no longer listed, at least not in the UK.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Looks like I'll go for an ex demo on 17 inch wheels. It drove well and not overly stiff. Probably needs about 15% less stiffness for true compliance but the marketing people have probably overruled the engineers. Only 150BHP but I'll see how this works with the auto gearbox. I didn't try the manual override and can see how using it in ECO+ might make it great in London.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Deal done! A demonstrator Cross Country Pro with 17 inch wheels (2018 model). Has the Winter Pack and front parking sensors. Finished in Denim Blue with Blonde interior. Really looking forward to it.
 

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The other benefit of the CC is the 40mm raised suspension does make it slightly easier to get in and out of the car. My previous R Design C30 was a bit of a struggle sometimes !
 

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Totally agree. It's just about right for us. We looked at a number of SUV style alternatives but in almost all you were actually climbing up to get in!
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Car Magazine reported thus...

There’s actually no extra suspension travel (the ride height boost comes courtesy of longer wheel spindles up front and modified link arms at the rear) and Volvo’s altered the damping rates and added new anti-roll bars to compensate for the Cross Country’s loftier stance

But I've not been able to substantiate this. I don't know what they mean by longer wheel spindles. Perhaps the parts information would be a better guide.
 

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Car Magazine reported thus...

There’s actually no extra suspension travel (the ride height boost comes courtesy of longer wheel spindles up front and modified link arms at the rear) and Volvo’s altered the damping rates and added new anti-roll bars to compensate for the Cross Country’s loftier stance

But I've not been able to substantiate this. I don't know what they mean by longer wheel spindles. Perhaps the parts information would be a better guide.
The entire suspension system is different between the V40 and V40CC (springs, dampers, front knuckles, front track control arms, rear trailing arms and rear wishbones). The raised ride height is mostly implemented in the front knuckles and rear trailing arms.
Here's a V40 front knuckle:
and here's a V40CC front knuckle:
You can see that most of the raised ride height is achieved by stretching the top of the knuckle where the damper attaches . The dampers and springs are the same length between the V40 and v40CC, but have different rates. The track control arms, rear trailing arms and rear wishbones have to be lengthened for the V40CC to maintain the correct suspension geometry whith the raised ride height.
 

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Buzby, thanks for posting all this information. I've also struggled to understand the differences between these using the descriptions from brochures and press releases, and the pictures illustrate it really well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Wow. That's perfect Buzby. So we can translate "Longer wheel spindles" to mean extended knuckles. It seems quite elaborate when the same could have been achieved by longer springs and dampers.
It looks like the steering rack will be working at a greater angle but I don't feel any deterioration.

I'm quite pleased by the ride and compliance in the CC compared to the standard but I know I'm on fairly tall 17 inch rubber.
 

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Wow. That's perfect Buzby. So we can
It looks like the steering rack will be working at a greater angle but I don't feel any deterioration.
.
The CC has drop link balljoints on the end of the steering rack arms to make up for the arms on the knuckles being lower, which keeps the steering rack geometry roughly the same as a standard V40.
 

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I've had V40CC T3 for 12 months now, on 17/50/225 tyres. For me the ride is way too firm and I find suspension too noisy. It's not what I expected from comfy volvo. On test ride I got a model with 16 inch weels and it felt alright. I drove my friend V40 (a few years older, 180k km millage) and it was completly different feeling. Is that possible that Volvo changed suspension settings during the production? My car was manufactured in June 2019. I can't imagine that Audi is even stiffer. To have a sensible ride I deflate front tyres to 2.1 bar and rear to 2.0 - 0.3 below standard settings.
 
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