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Welcome, but first you need to say what wheel and tyre size you currently have and which brand/design of tyres.
 

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I have 18's with Michelin tyres, and road noise is an issue, but I think it's only because of the alloy size and the low profile tyre wall.

I thought though the standard size rim was 17's not 16's ?

At the time I bought my V40 there was also a 19" option, but the style they came in wasn't very nice, so I opted for the 18's.
If I'm honest I think the 17's look a bit too small for the size of the car, so I'm surprised there's also a 16" ?
 

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No, my car is on 205/65R16 tyres on original alloys from new. I'm not a fan of tyres below about a 55 profile. Each to their own, but I think that large wheels and very low profile tyres look ridiculous, even more so on off road type vehicles that become completely incapable of driving up a kerb without a high risk of tyre or even wheel damage :ROFLMAO:

They are fashion over function I'm afraid. Any handling advantage they might have over higher profile tyres is completely unusable on a public road, and the state of many roads these days means a proportionately higher risk of expensive tyre or wheel damage and passenger discomfort. They are just a fashion accessory for the bling brigade that serve no useful purpose whatsoever. Sorry! If the overall wheel and tyre diameter is the same no matter the size of wheel and profile of the tyre, how can they look too small for the car, except from a modern fashion aesthetic?

But I can appreciate the benefit of slightly larger wheels on the more powerful variants to accommodate larger brakes.
 

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No, my car is on 205/65R16 tyres on original alloys from new. I'm not a fan of tyres below about a 55 profile. Each to their own, but I think that large wheels and very low profile tyres look ridiculous, even more so on off road type vehicles that become completely incapable of driving up a kerb without a high risk of tyre or even wheel damage :ROFLMAO:

They are fashion over function I'm afraid. Any handling advantage they might have over higher profile tyres is completely unusable on a public road, and the state of many roads these days means a proportionately higher risk of expensive tyre or wheel damage and passenger discomfort. They are just a fashion accessory for the bling brigade that serve no useful purpose whatsoever. Sorry! IF the overall wheel and tyre diameter is the same no matter the sixe of wheel and profile of the tyre, how can they look too small for the car, except from a modern fashion aesthetic?

But I can appreciate the benefit of slightly larger wheels on the more powerful variants to accommodate larger brakes.
Do the 16" make for a quiet ride in respect of road noise
 

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Do 16" make for a quiet ride in respect of road noise?
I certainly have no complaints. In fact my V40 is far quieter than my previous car and encourages smooth driving, as it just seems to glide along. There is very little in the way of road noise or jarring over uneven road surfaces, and I would still describe the handling as superb.

In contrast my son has an M-Sport BMW which I can only describe as bone jarring and not relaxing in any way. You can actually hear the car bouncing over some road surfaces due to the harshness of the suspension. It might handle well on a race track but on our roads with pot holes and other defects, spirited cornering could quite easily see you on the wrong side of the road after traversing a pot hole without any warning. I've had that experience with some of the prospective patrol cars we've trialled. Mitsubishi Evo was one. Fantastic track car, but on a rough road surface when pushing hard :oops:
 

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My 1st V40 had 205/50/17, matching set of Falken 310's and was far quieter than my old Vauxhall insignia on 245/45/18 Avons. However V40 no.2 has 225/45/47 fitted with 2 ditchfinders called roadstone on the front, a ditchfinder called AAA one rear side and a new Falken 510 the other. (Not my choice) So bad is the noise, (re my question posted a while back regarding intermediate driveshaft bearings...)I booked it in to the dealer a week back to investigate, thinking a shocker or bearing was failing, their findings are the budget tyres. Allegedly.
So, I'd be sure to choose a low rated db tyre, 69-70 maybe with an A wet grip from at least Falken upwards in terms of perceived quality.
 

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No, my car is on 205/65R16 tyres on original alloys from new. I'm not a fan of tyres below about a 55 profile. Each to their own, but I think that large wheels and very low profile tyres look ridiculous, even more so on off road type vehicles that become completely incapable of driving up a kerb without a high risk of tyre or even wheel damage :ROFLMAO:

They are fashion over function I'm afraid. Any handling advantage they might have over higher profile tyres is completely unusable on a public road, and the state of many roads these days means a proportionately higher risk of expensive tyre or wheel damage and passenger discomfort. They are just a fashion accessory for the bling brigade that serve no useful purpose whatsoever. Sorry! If the overall wheel and tyre diameter is the same no matter the size of wheel and profile of the tyre, how can they look too small for the car, except from a modern fashion aesthetic?

But I can appreciate the benefit of slightly larger wheels on the more powerful variants to accommodate larger brakes.
As you say, each to their own.

Personally I think the V40 needs a larger rim as the car is fairly long and I think a large wheel arch, anything smaller than 17" minimum, would in my opinion look a lost in the wheel arch.

I would agree with crossover/off road type vehicles looking a bit daft with ultra low profile tyres.
A colleague in work has a Range Rover Evoque with 20" rims and ultra low profile tyres, the car itself is cracking, but it looks absolutely ridiculous with the wheel/tyre set up.
I think the alloy rim size, combined with the tyre size set up can make or break the look of a car.

I had 19's on my previous RCZ with low profile tyres as standard, it would of been madness if Peugeot had put anything smaller, the style, stance and size of the car had to have large rims for it to look uniform, and that's where I think the V40 has a better look with a larger rim, in my opinion !

We could go around in circles (excuse the pun), with this though, as it's all down to personal opinion.
I put up with the extra road noise as I think the car looks better with 18's, perhaps 17's at a push, but I wouldn't put low profiles on a 17" rim as it would look too small in the arch.

Each to their own eh !
 
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We could go around in circles (excuse the pun), with this though, as it's all down to personal opinion.
I put up with the extra road noise as I think the car looks better with 18's, perhaps 17's at a push, but I wouldn't put low profiles on a 17" rim as it would look too small in the arch.

Each to their own eh !
Yep. And I'm from an era where low profile tyres were the 70 series boots on my RS3100 :D
 

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Showing your age now,:ROFLMAO: .

I think Volvo are a bit behind in styling to other makes, especially I would say over the last 3-5 years.
Volvo recognize this, hence offering add on's like larger rims, sports suspension, styling kits ect ect , but only as optional extras, therefore giving the more style conscious buyer more of a choice to help lift the V40 to a point where it might be a bit more in keeping with what's on the roads next to them.

Volvo are obviously trying to move the brand forward, more up to date and inline with other makes on the roads these days, but at the same time not wanting to offend and lose the old brigade, who still want things to look and feel bog standard, so that they can enjoy a jolly comfortable drive on a Sunday afternoon to the seafront to sit and watch the waves, whilst chewing on cucumber sarnies and trying to hold their dentures in place. :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

Volvo, for years have had this label attached to the brand as being solid but boring cars for old gents, which these days with so many good looking stylish cars on the roads, is not good baggage to keep carrying around, hence the choice of optional styling extras to try and push the model forward a bit in regards to it's styling, but at the same time offering these extras as optional, which in turn is trying to please both types of buyer, the old school pipe puffing buyer, and perhaps entice other types of buyer who might want to add a bit more of the fresher looking style by adding these types of optional extras.

Again though how any owner styles his/her car is all down to personal choice, subtle changes can & do make a big difference to the look of a car in many cases, and all for the better.(y)
 
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Momentums have 16inch rims as standard.
I have a D2 Momentum Nav Plus with newish 205/65R16's Michelin Primacy 4 tyres on and Yes it sits a little lowish compared to R Design models but I like it that way and wouldn't want any larger rims because of the lower profile and rougher ride.
When I first got the car last July I did think that there was a some slight road noise but now I don't notice it all all. I must say though that it rides the bumps and potholes of the UK roads very well and it really corners on rails when pushed!
 

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As said already, it's horses for courses.
Looks and style or comfort I guess is one way of looking at it.
Anyway gentlemen from a certain era should not be hacking someone else's post with their own agenda, so let's agree to disagree and give the post back to the donpauline123 (y)

On that note.
@ donpauline123,
Less tyre wall = harder ride and more road noise.
More tyre wall = softer ride less road noise.
Personally I'm not sure if a smaller diameter rim would add or lessen the road noise as I would of thought it's the hardness of lower profile tyre walls and the distance from road surface to the rim that increases the noise.

My son has a Ford Ranger Wild Track with 20" rims but also huge tyres to match with deep walls, it's one of the smoothest and quietest vehicles I've ever driven, my point is, I think it's the depth & stiffness of the tyre wall not the rim size that produces more noise ?
 

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As said already, it's horses for courses.
Looks and style or comfort I guess is one way of looking at it.
Anyway gentlemen from a certain era should not be hacking someone else's post with their own agenda, so let's agree to disagree and give the post back to the donpauline123 (y)
I thought that discussion was already over, and I said each to their own right from the start.

Less tyre wall = harder ride and more road noise.
More tyre wall = softer ride less road noise.
Personally I'm not sure if a smaller diameter rim would add or lessen the road noise as I would of thought it's the hardness of lower profile tyre walls and the distance from road surface to the rim that increases the noise.
It is, but for any vehicle, only certain tyre size and wheel size combinations are approved by the manufacturer, or can be physically fitted without fouling bodywork etc.

So to the V40 in particular; all Volvo approved wheel and tyre sizes aim to achieve the same overall tyre diameter and similar rolling circumference, within a margin of a few percent. The only way you can increase the height of the sidewall of the tyre whilst maintaining a compatible overall diameter and rolling circumference is to decrease the diameter of the wheel, which allows a compatible tyre with a greater sidewall height profile to be fitted.

Any increase in sidewall profile will be beneficial in reducing NVH, but for a driver or owner who is mainly concerned with reducing both as much as possible, the greatest improvement will be obtained by fitting the largest profile tyre (and hence smallest diameter wheel) that the construction of the vehicle allows. Not all V40s will be able to accommodate a 16 inch diameter wheel; it depends on the size of the brake discs and calipers fitted to each model, but I think most, if not all will take a 17-inch wheel in standard production trim.

That is all that Volvo do, but in reverse, when specifying larger wheel diameters. The profile of the compatible tyre is decreased to maintain a similar overall diameter for the wheel and tyre combination.

So no, the diameter of the wheel itself has little bearing on NVH, but if you try and fit a tyre with a higher sidewall profile to your 18/19 inch wheel, you may need to get your tin snips and a lump hammer out, to modify the bodywork to accommodate it ;)
 

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Tin snips sound like too much hard work, I'll stick with the raised noise and firmer ride, and it looks nicer (in my opinion) 😉
One thing I have noticed is the slightly reduced turning circle with the 18" rim, apparently due to some sort of restrictor being fitted to stop the tyre rubbing against the arch ?
 

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One thing I have noticed is the slightly reduced turning circle with the 18" rim, apparently due to some sort of restrictor being fitted to stop the tyre rubbing against the arch ?
Yes, Volvo fit spacer block to each end of the steering rack to limit its travel, and reprogram the power steering control module with new software that creates a resistance when approaching full lock, to limit the possibility of the spacer blocks damaging the rack. You could call it a cobbled together solution to allow larger wheels and tyres to be fitted than were intended when the car was designed :ROFLMAO:
 
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