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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! First time poster here from Sweden.

So this weekend I lifted our 2018 V40 to change tires. As per the manual I used the inner lifting points in the front for my floor jack.

I used a good hard rubber jack pad and the car was nice and steady - but to my big disappointment the anti rust rubber coating came of like a band aid where I had placed the pad.

How well treated is the metal here - is this something I should be worried about?

for some reason it kinda bothers me.

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Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire
 

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Personally I wouldn't be concerned, I think the body will outlive the drivetrain even with the scrape underside! BUT, if you are concerned you could pick up an underseal product in either an aerosol or tin (and brush) just for peace of mind:)
 

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On my V40 I always use the pinch-weld lifting points with a slotted rubber pad on the jack, but it's quite common for underseal or paint to be dislodged or pulled off when jacking a vehicle. There is a lot of weight concentrated on a very small area (the jack plate or pad) and a lot of pressure. On our other vehicles I always touch in or repaint the affected area after jacking, but that's not the service you would get in a garage.

With one car I used to own, that I entered in concours competitions, I used to take rubber blocks and pads with me to the annual MOT, and insist on being present throughout the test to position them between the jacking beams and the underbody :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On my V40 I always use the pinch-weld lifting points with a slotted rubber pad on the jack, but it's quite common for underseal or paint to be dislodged or pulled off when jacking a vehicle. There is a lot of weight concentrated on a very small area (the jack plate or pad) and a lot of pressure. On our other vehicles I always touch in or repaint the affected area after jacking, but that's not the service you would get in a garage.

With one car I used to own, that I entered in concours competitions, I used to take rubber blocks and pads with me to the annual MOT, and insist on being present throughout the test to position them between the jacking beams and the underbody :)
Hi! Thank you for your reply. You are in some way correct - BUT if you have a look at the manual for the V40 it clearly says that when lifting with a garage jack in the FRONT you should use the INNER lifting points as opposed to the pinch welds. The pinch welds should only be used in the front when the car is lifted on 4 points (workshop pillar)

I'm not sure if the pinch weld is weaker in the front - or if it's simply because of the higher weight (engine/gearbox)

Automotive parking light Land vehicle Automotive tail & brake light Wheel Car
 

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Hi! Thank you for your reply. You are in some way correct - BUT if you have a look at the manual for the V40 it clearly says that when lifting with a garage jack in the FRONT you should use the INNER lifting points as opposed to the pinch welds. The pinch welds should only be used in the front when the car is lifted on 4 points (workshop pillar)
That's because I use a Quickjack ;)

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
anyone else experienced this? should I be worried about rust on these jack points? And if it were to happen - can these jack points be replaced by a Volvo Body shop?
 

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anyone else experienced this? should I be worried about rust on these jack points? And if it were to happen - can these jack points be replaced by a Volvo Body shop?
It's fairly normal on jacking points as I said above. Replacement would be a fairly large job, but they are substantial pieces of metal, otherwise they wouldn't be jacking points. Yes, they may start to show corrosion (sooner or later) if the underseal and/or paint is disturbed, as is common on many cars with bare painted underbodies. It would probably take many years for any corrosion to become safety critical, but touching in the areas that have had the underseal removed, either with a brush on or spray on underseal or stone chip paint, will restore protection and cosmetic appearance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The only thing that worries me is making it worse by applying the wrong compound or not getting it totally dry before applying.

Maybe I should just let it be?

Not entirely sure what Volvo is using from the factory and what the purpose of it is? Is it solely rustproofing?

I’m now reading horror stories about rubber compound trapping moisture bevind and rusting it from the inside
 

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Looking at your photo, I suspect it's a stone-chip type coating applied over the base coat after paint-dipping. I was pleasantly surprised to find that my MY2017 came with a thick black wax based non-setting underbody protection all over the floorpan and suspension components. One reason I try and avoid using the inner jacking points, because it gets everywhere if disturbed.

But if you're only looking at recoating those jacking point pressings, I'd suggest a light rub down with wet and dry paper, followed by degreasing, and then applying a coat of POR-15 rust-preventive paint. It's not cheap, but once cured it forms an extremely tough and relatively thick coating that nothing will shift. I used it extensively on a classic car that I restored and would highly recommend it. I doubt you'd have any problems with paint peeling off when jacking the car again, providing the surface was properly prepared before applying it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all replies guys. Still pondering whether I should fix it (applying new coat) or just let it be.
If I fix it I must be 100% that it’s dry and that none of the paint under has chipped.

I would be devastated of it started to rust since the car is almost new and we’re planning on keeping it 5-6 years
 

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Unless you're prepared to get under the car at least once a year and fix any small patches of corrosion that you find, it is a fact of life that there will be components or areas under the car that will be subject to rust, if only to a minor extent. But compared to 40 years ago, when most car owners spent their weekends derusting, filling, sanding and repainting or welding in new sections of metalwork on any car more than a few years old, modern cars are vastly improved./
 
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